Skip to Content Skip to Navigation

Incorporating genetics into forest valuation models – IRRPLAN

The project aims to recognise the contribution of improved genetics in plantations at the time of establishment by estimating expected future values of key physical traits on a site and stand specific basis. Tree improvement programs have been successful in breeding trees with enhanced physical traits being growth, form, wood properties and health attributes. Forest growers are deploying these genetically improved trees in the re-establishment programs of pines and eucalypts, but the added value is not usually recognised in forest valuation models until inventory measurements are done up to ten years after establishment. By not accounting for the expected increases in yield and product quality, the projected return on investment is potentially underestimated. Recognising the marginal increase in value due to the deployment of improved genetics in young stands is critical for investors to make informed decisions about likely returns and alternative land uses. The increase in value to be estimated by the grower requires stand specific estimates of improved physical traits while accounting for genotype by environment interactions.

Project date

19 Mar 2019-31 Jul 2021

Principal investigator

Tony McRae

Project funded by

Multiple industries
Forestry Natural capital assets Other rural industries

Forest and Wood Products Australia (FWPA)

Forest and Wood Products Australia Limited (FWPA) is a not-for-profit company that provides national, integrated research and development services to …

Multiple industries
Forestry Natural capital assets Other rural industries
  • Location

    Australia

  • Organisation type

    Research funding body

Logo for Forest and Wood Products Australia (FWPA)

Industries

Technology areas

Related research projects

Search all research projects
Logo for Innovative nursery management solutions to sustainably manage root disease, improve nursery utilization, and enhance resilience and productivity of planted pines
Forestry

Innovative nursery management solutions to sustainably manage root disease, improve nursery utilization, and enhance resilience and productivity of planted pines

Root-borne diseases are increasingly affecting tree production nurseries, lowering productivity and profitability. This project will improve nursery management by defining the right balance of fertilizer, fungicide and microbial inoculum to break the disease cycle, and use field trials to refine treatments to improve establishment and resilience post-planting.
  • Funded by

    Forest and Wood Products Australia (FWPA)

  • Project date

    15 Mar 2022 - 30 May 2024

  • Research organisation

    Western Sydney University (WSU)

Logo for Sustained productivity gains in softwood plantations through enablement of single-step genomic selection
Forestry

Sustained productivity gains in softwood plantations through enablement of single-step genomic selection

This project forms part of a series that aims to at least double the rate of genetic gain in pine tree breeding in Australia. This project will focus on the extensive network of trials and orchards in the Gippsland region of Victoria to further implement cutting-edge single-step genomic selection, provide pedigree and identity assurance for the radiata pine breeding and deployment populations, and deliver new, high-throughput sample processing methods.
  • Funded by

    Forest and Wood Products Australia (FWPA)

  • Project date

    30 Mar 2022 - 30 May 2024

Have questions?

Find out how we can help you.

Find answers to our most frequently asked questions on research projects, commercial opportunities, organisations and more. 

Still have questions or have feedback on the site? Please get in touch by completing our enquiry form.