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Better sorghum: larger grain with more protein

Feed grains are utilised primarily as a source of energy, with most of the energy from starch, with the protein component usually considered of secondary importance. However, protein needs to be supplemented from crops such as soybean or lupin, and this represents a more expensive input per unit of metabolisable energy. Seed storage protein in sorghum is notorious for low digestibility, and can have adverse impacts on starch availability. In addition, small or variable grain size, a common problem in sorghum, results in yield losses to the farmer and higher processing costs for feed rations and human food uses. This investment aims to use novel genetic approaches to increase grain size, grain protein content and grain protein digestibility to produce high value sorghum hybrids to increase grower profitability.

Project date

30 Jan 2018-31 Oct 2021

Project funded by

Multiple industries
Alternative protein Cereal grains Other rural industries Pulse grains

Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC)

GRDC's purpose is to invest in RD&E to create enduring profitability for Australian growers. We invest in projects and …

Multiple industries
Alternative protein Cereal grains Other rural industries Pulse grains
  • Location

    Australia

  • Organisation type

    Research funding body

Logo for Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC)

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Logo for Australian Cereal Rust Control Program -Wheat and barley breeding support
Cereal grains

Australian Cereal Rust Control Program -Wheat and barley breeding support

Cereal rust diseases can cause significant yield losses. Genetic resistance in commercial varieties is an important part of the management …
  • Funded by

    Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC)

  • Project date

    1 Jan 2018 - 31 Dec 2022

  • Research organisation

    The University of Sydney (USYD)

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